XIII
September 18, 2014
The boy made it into The #DailyNews.

Story Here: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/harlem-tenants-surprised-learn-3m-fund-call-youth-programs-beefed-security-article-1.1942269

The boy made it into The #DailyNews.

Story Here:
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/harlem-tenants-surprised-learn-3m-fund-call-youth-programs-beefed-security-article-1.1942269

September 8, 2014
Fear Is A CHOICE

"Fear is a choice" - Will Smith, After Earth

"Everybody’s scared" - Hov


Ray Rice didn’t fear his girl, or he wouldn’t have hit her. He didn’t fear losing his job, or he wouldv’e thought twice about committing an act to do so.

The NFL didn’t fear penalizing Rice for 2 games , before the season started, when they knew from a previous video that his girl was knocked out… enough to be dragged from an elevator, by the only man who was on the elevator with her (btw that was Ray Rice). That was until TMZ released extra footage today; that was more graphic and would probably make the NFL lose partnerships and all types of dollars, concluding that Ray Rice should have been penalized more severely to begin with, which plenty of pundits had already said.

Fear is not that big of a deal. It is a situational decision we make, leading to us choosing to rather not do an action because we are afraid of the unknown, or you feel like you do know the consequence to said action and choose to not do it, because you fear the consequence and rather not deal with that.

Arguing about what is right and wrong makes no sense, because we all have our beliefs, but in reality… issues still happen. So, just know that every individual, including decision makers, gets scared, but fear is a choice. Worry about the things that frighten you and how you’re going to overcome them.

September 8, 2014
Seis

Seis

September 6, 2014
at Bedford Avenue

at Bedford Avenue

September 6, 2014
#MarvelVsCapcom (at Williamsburg Cinemas)

#MarvelVsCapcom (at Williamsburg Cinemas)

September 4, 2014
#TBT with my guy @whoislogic by CAU. Don’t fret, I’m not gon’ flex like that was my all-white thing, but I did know the owner. Free my guy. This was ‘06 in #TheA right after the Defining Moments dropped. Shouts to my guys that escaped the shit some of the other homies didn’t, that’s all I can say. #RunThroughTheCheckWasTheProtocol #ComeHomeSoon #BackToTheTrap #HolyGhost

#TBT with my guy @whoislogic by CAU. Don’t fret, I’m not gon’ flex like that was my all-white thing, but I did know the owner. Free my guy. This was ‘06 in #TheA right after the Defining Moments dropped. Shouts to my guys that escaped the shit some of the other homies didn’t, that’s all I can say. #RunThroughTheCheckWasTheProtocol #ComeHomeSoon #BackToTheTrap #HolyGhost

August 31, 2014
@IAmDiddy #PineAppleExpress (at Morgan’s Pier)

@IAmDiddy #PineAppleExpress (at Morgan’s Pier)

August 31, 2014
#Made (at Budweiser, Made In America)

#Made (at Budweiser, Made In America)

August 28, 2014

These 13 minutes were worth more to me than any other concert / festival this summer. Plus, I didn’t even have to leave Home.

August 27, 2014

Trayvon Martin, Sean Bell & Mike Brown’s Mothers

August 27, 2014

Jon Stewart on Ferguson

August 25, 2014
gifts from #TheMotherland (at بوابة القاهرة _ Cairo Portal)

gifts from #TheMotherland (at بوابة القاهرة _ Cairo Portal)

August 25, 2014
"A Lament for Institutionalized Racism "

In the aftermath of the killings of Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Ezell Ford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and countless other Black men by the hands of law enforcers, citizens of the U.S. (primarily Black and White) have had numerous issues resurface about race and the situations racism causes to this day. Most of these issues stem from individual opinion, coming from those who feel that: 1) Black people protest against White murderers of Black men, but not when there is “Black on Black crime”; 2) Black people would not be killed if they wore professional clothing, instead of Hip-Hop fashion (see CNN anchor Don Lemon’s “5 Ways Black People Need to Change to Combat Racism”) ; 3) Mike Brown and other Blacks killed by police got what they deserved. ; 4) Racism simply does not exist anymore (both White and Black people). However, the fact is that all 4 of these opinions could not have been derived without Institutionalized Racism and its effect on American society.


According to Wikipedia (not the best source, I know), Institutionalized Racism is defined as “any system of inequality based on race”. Statistically, many economic categories will find the Black man as the demographic who faces the most inequality across the board, especially when it comes to any form of upward mobility. In America, racism has been institutionalized to the point that there is a major divide between modern Black people themselves, based on lighter or darker pigment of skin, economic class, or something as silly as where someone comes from. Most of the Institutionalized Racism that Blacks face when dealing with each other currently, has been diffused from Slavery (the House Negro vs. Field Negro theory), as some Blacks think they are better than others, or simply don’t see their fellow Black man or woman as equal to them.


Additionally, the Black “leadership” in the United States has an old guard, and an old way of doing things (protests, marches, speeches), however, it has not brought about different results in this day and age. Young Black men are still being killed, by each other yes, but also at the hands of police, who are supposed to protect and serve common citizens and arrest a citizen who committed a crime. The elder Blacks, such as Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and other politicians have refused to let go of some of their political power, or mentor any of the younger Black politicians who have the pulse of the local youth and relevant matters. These same elders did not support President Obama when he was in Democratic primaries vs. Hillary Clinton, back in 2008. Their lack of support was not because they didn’t agree with the then Senator’s political platforms, but because they simply did not believe he could win the Presidency. The reason for all of this is because police, many White people, and Blacks themselves do not see the value in a Black person’s life. How could this be?

After President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation was to “free slaves” in the Civil War era, Jim Crow laws came about. As the Harlem Renaissance and Civil Rights movements began to impact Blacks in a positive way, Black men were sent to World War II and the Vietnam War respectively, while those who stayed in the U.S. battled Jim Crow. Black people were also redlined into ghettoes of U.S. cities - by local and state governments - to keep them segregated from Whites, after Civil Rights laws were passed. As Hip-Hop and gang culture was created in these ghettoes - to lead to more positive impacts for Blacks - the U.S. government allowed cocaine to flood into these same areas, leading to the crack epidemic, which led to high rates of “Black on Black crime,” disproportionate jail sentences for Black males (RICO laws) and the spread of the AIDS virus. Therefore, in recent times when Blacks have come together to create systemic change that could lead to positive impacts, the government has countered with an institutionalized way to decimate the men and essentially the race. I did not even mention the individual Black leaders who were incarcerated or murdered during any of these times.


It was not until the late 70’s and 1980’s when Black people had an actual influence on Institutionalized Racism, as those born in the late 50’s and 1960’s were able to be college educated and share Black culture (music, literature, ways of life) in a major way, because of television and film. Not only that, there was no “defined” way for Blacks to succeed. As long as they did their respective work, there were opportunities for different kinds of Blacks to progress. There was Richard Pryor and Bill Cosby; Billy Dee Williams and Sidney Poitier. Black men were able to possess their own style, and not have to conform much to what White society wanted, because at this time, this second Black Renaissance was new and could not yet be countered in an institutionalized way.

Furthermore, the Black sitcom - many of them syndicated on national television stations - put African-Americans in the homes of White people, who were able to see us laugh, cry, face struggles and overcome them. Many White people were able to see a Black man have a family (Good Times, The Jeffersons, The Cosby Show), work, and instill values of upward mobility into his children. This was very important because this combated their perceptions from what they may have seen from Blacks otherwise - such as the drug epidemic, and other nonsense some Black people were involved in - and allowed the image of the Black man to have positive sustenance. By the 1990’s, there was “The Fresh Prince,” “Martin,” and other shows that allowed Black people to be themselves culturally, yet, still showed their duality of being someone who worked, had a family and progressed in a positive way. However, since all of these shows ended, there has been no counteractive way to show that most Black people have the same behaviors or aspirations to succeed as Whites, and this has damaged both Black and White people, because there is a lack of an image to show that sentiment.


Since the 1990’s and the rise of Hip-Hop music, the music industry has been the latest force to inflict Institutionalized Racism. In the 1980’s and 1990’s there was a balance in Hip-Hop, where there was “gangsta rap,” like 2Pac and The Notorious B.I.G., “conscious rap,” like Mos Def and Common, and Southern Hip Hop from the likes of UGK, Master P’s No Limit Records and Birdman’s Cash Money Records. As rap music became a huge money maker in this decade, Black men became moguls, earned large influence, and were able to expand their business into other activities to earn revenue. However, most of their music companies were, and still are, distributed by major corporations - such as Vivendi and other mass media companies - who only seek profit, ignoring cultural integrity or artistic expressions.


In Lamen’s terms, the Hip Hop artists who are “conscious,” or promote positivity, have a hard time selling records, because their music company does not see them as a priority at radio / TV. Thus, they fall out of the mass media system while losing or missing out on large numbers of the Hip Hop audience. Therefore, many Hip Hop artists have made a conscious choice (http://revolt.tv/news/french-montana-thinks-lyrical-rappers-are-broke-danny-brown-couldnt-agree-less/F413E274-CE92-4716-8DAA-1276CC7FB599) to promote misogyny, sex, violence, crime and other negative aspects of life, in order to make a “hit record” and have a larger appeal in the media to make money.


What the mass media surrounding ignorant rap music has done for the overall image of Black men, is revert it back for White people who do not understand the Black culture or our ways or life, and Black people who are not from the ghettos were Hip-Hop has been traditionally cultivated, to think that Black men only sell drugs, commit acts of violence, get rich and not invest their money, and disrespect women. This is why some White people cannot see any positivity or equality in Black men, because the negative images of us from the media are of constant ignorance and nothing else. The President and other successful Blacks in these times are usually rich and/or famous, so, their work is not shown, or as known to the common man. Since many White people do not live where Blacks live, or share some of the same life experiences as us, fear, disrespect and blatant racism has been able to resurface.

Many White people already have the privilege of being White, where they do not have to face the inequalities diffused from Institutionalized Racism like Blacks do. However, some Whites have, and other White people are able to make educated inferences about different Black people’s character and the difference between a Black person’s music and entertainment and who they are in real life. Nevertheless, the murders of Mike Brown and the others aforementioned in the beginning of this piece show that overall: a Black man’s life does not mean much in modern day America. The Justice System, in many local areas, is controlled by White people who are racist, chauvinist, and have negative beliefs of Black men from their perceptions. They do not see anything wrong with executing a Black teenager, simply because he may have stolen some cigars. One mistake from a Black youth is punishable by death from a White person, without any tolerance for protest, outrage, or wish for justice by other Black people, in their opinion. The same privilege I have touched on, is why many White people and even some Blacks, cannot empathize with these deaths, or believe racism exists now.

Institutionalized Racism has reached the point to where the majority of relevant companies of print journalism (https://twitter.com/daniecal/status/503917996793135105 ), can publicize a Black victim as someone who was “not an angel” (who is?), but a White perpetrator of a major U.S. city bombing as a misguided youth (who hasn’t been?). The media, government, police and other American “institutions” have long enforced racism, as the disproportionate statistics and stories of Black men show. Holding back Black men has become its own institution, which has damaged the African-American family for generations.


To fight this current Institutionalized Racism, Black people have to use social media, sports, Hip-Hop and other forms of penetrating mass media to also show that we are husbands, sons, fathers and civilized people. This still may not prevent a Black man from getting killed, but it is work that can be done, instead of protesting, marching and doing the same things that have only led to more Black men being killed. The perception of the Black man has to change, and then Black men will see value in themselves and also value their women in private and in the media. We have become an era where we do negativity or lose integrity for quick fame and money, because of Institutionalized Racism. We have to combat it, at every opportunity, instead of allowing ourselves to be the fool and play a role in it for money, while we are simultaneously killed off because of the perceptions our media-controlled actions and portrayals create.


$

August 25, 2014
Flawless

Flawless

(Source: mattsgifs, via snicolee)

August 25, 2014
Side

Side